10 Reasons Why Dhoom 3 Disappointed Me

Dec 28, 2013 by     No Comments    Posted under: Entertainment, Screenplay

The much-awaited Dhoom 3 was finally realeased in India on the 20th this month and it broke several records on its opening days in India. Box Office India declared Dhoom 3 “the biggest hit of 2013” after two days of release, with the film grossing INR2 billion (US$31 million) worldwide in just three days. Even in Pakistan, Dhoom 3 also set a new opening record, beating the previous record held by Pakistani film Waar. The movie, in which Abhishek Bachchan and Uday Chopra reprise their roles from the two prequels, stars Amir Khan as the antihero, and Katrina Kaif alongside him.

Even though the movie has done amazingly well on the box office, but not all critics thinks it’s worthy of the spotlight. Raja Sen of Rediff gave it 1.5 out of 5 stars and judged, “Dhoom 3 is a children’s film made for children who’ve never seen a film”. One of our correspondents went to watch it, and here are his 10 reasons why the movie disappointed him.

  1. Baseless Storyline with too much drama. You expect class from an Amir Khan’s film. This just seemed over-rated, with the double-role in the wake of way too many desperate show-offs! I must say, Hrithik and John looked much more original in their act.
  2. Weird Catch-Phrase. Maybe I’m more of a fan of the poetry of ‘Zindagi na Milay gee Dobara’ but this thing that Amir Khan kept saying over the course of the movie was crappy!
  3. Katrina’s insignificance. Her role was just too peripheral! How can you even do that to her?! Whenever it came to the bad guys, it was just Amir Khan plastered all over the screen. And all they focused on were Katrina’s thighs. Although most people won’t mind that.
  4. Too much cinematography maybe? I totally get the concept of Indians trying to replicate Hollywood action sequels but this was just one action sequence too many. At one point, you start feeling they are just over-doing it by showing them too often!
  5. Abishek Bachan and Uday Chopra’s characters too unimpressive. I thought the story of the movie was supposed to be made around Jai and Ali (their characters) in the first place. This time around, they just seemed hungry for action, nothing more!
  6. The movie score is, well, okay. Again, ‘okay’ is just too average for the biggest movie of the year! The theme soundtrack was the only one that could be called catchy, and well, that one’s been around since forever, ain’t it?
  7. An unfulfilling ending. No, that is, again, not Amir Khan’s Style! Please jump off a dam like a clown? And since, you’re jumping, why not take your twin brother along too? Oh, it gets me so emotional!
  8. Height matters! I think the casting director’s take on this one would have been like, ‘Let’s just get Amir, he has a huge fan base.’ What he forgot to factor in was the height factor in the Dhoom prequels! The antihero looks so much shorter than his two antagonists, that it actually bothers you all along the movie, specifically in all of their faceoffs.
  9. Cast shortened in lieu of budget crisis? Bad, Bad Idea! The Dhoom family adds more touch and uniqueness to the whole film experience. They had a story beyond the action of the film and that made it more enjoyable.
  10. Don’t know why bikes were so central to this one. In the first movie, it made sense to have bikes; it was all about bikes. In this one, it just seems they added it for the sake of sustaining the theme of the franchise. I don’t think that’s such a good idea.

Summary: In a nutshell, the movie didn’t live up to my expectations. I’m sure it won’t live up to yours either, unless they are really low. The only reason it made big business is because of its extensive pre-premiere marketing, in a country where movies like Dabangg and Dabangg 2 hold the records. I rest my case.

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